The Piano of Forgiveness

In one of the early lessons, I noticed that each subject I applied it to gave me a different feeling. Applications on the same subject[1] would yield the same feeling on subsequent applications, yet each subject yielded a different feeling. And the predominant spectrum of the feeling was/is hard to soft. So it is like a piano, with each subject being a key that gives a specific 'note'. A piano the size of the universe of perception, with many dimensions[2]. Anything that can be thougth of has a note.

Here's the fun part: you never know what note something will make until you apply forgiveness to it. The first strike is always the most rewarding and interesting. Something that has been unforgiven and unnoticed for a long time has a lot of extra harmonics to it. After a few strikes, it settles down into something more predictable and you know what sound it's going to make, but at first there are often lots of tiny little gripes attached which only need one strike to be gone/released forever. So I started getting very curious about what note various things would make.

In a forgiven relationship, in which you have nothing left but love, there is no note at all. There is no string for the hammer in the piano to hit. Forgiveness has no effect because there is nothing there to forgive, so no 'noise' is made.

I have a few such relationships. Shout out to Jay and Elsie who I find very easy to love; since they've been a consistent part of my life, when I needed to choose subjects for my practise sessions I would often choose them.

As Arten & Pursah say: when there's nothing to forgive, celebrate. So I celebrate my friends.


  1. usually a person, but can be any object of the mind ↩︎

  2. a traditional piano has a single dimensional scale, from low to high ↩︎

Freyr LePage

autistic, nonbinary, white, middle class

United Kingdom